Current Affairs – Online Revision Group ( CA – ORG ) for CSP-2019 – Starts 30th March 2019


CSE Prelims 2019 is round the corner , and with this pressure is mounting on aspirants. It’s not uncommon to lose track of the prep and the hard work that one has put in across the year. 

With the objective of maximizing the outcome in the Preliminary Exam , Chrome IAS has come up with the program in Current Affairs to round up the important News of complete year  in a theme-wise manner. 
This is different from our earlier Current Affairs Focus Group Batch CA – FG ) as CA – ORG ( Current Affairs – Online Revision Group )  will be completely Online. This can help one to revisit important and relevant news to refresh and consolidate Current Affairs. 

Features of the Program :

Only Online Mode. 
Access to Online Videos will be provided to enrolled students. 
Notes in PDF format ( not to be circulated )
Fee – 5000 ( Exclusive of GST ) 
Course Fees Link Click Here
Demo link – Click Here

Gist of Editorials: The Basics are Vital| GS – II


Relevance : GS Paper II


Theme of the Article

There is no alternative to strengthening primary health care.

Why has this Issue Cropped Up?

The National Health Policy (NHP) 2017 advocated allocating resources of up to two-thirds or more to primary care. 

Is India on the Path of Providing Primary Health Care?

  • The current expenditure outlay is less than half of  the estimated requirement.
  • The present rate of building health and wellness centres is inadequate.
  • NHM’s share in the health budget fell to 50% in 2019.
  • There is a shortage of PHCs and sub-health centres .
  • Numerous primary-level facilities lack basic facilities such as toilets.
  • There is a staggering shortage of medical and paramedical staff.

Significance of Primary Health Care

  • There is no alternative to strengthening primary health care.
  • It’s role shall also be critical in the success of the PMJAY insurance scheme.

Conclusion

Without Primary Health Care, the ninth dimension (‘Healthy India’) of “Vision 2030” will remain unfulfilled


 

Gist of Editorials: The Gulf as a Channel of Peace| GS – II


Relevance : GS Paper II (International Relations)

[1000 words summarized to 200]


Gulf countries can help defuse the tensions between India and Pakistan.

The Pakistan angle

  • In the past, shared religious identity of Gulf with Pakistan gave it a political edge over India in the region.
  • In recent years, India has begun to correct that imbalance which can cause Gulf countries to put some pressure on Pakistan.

India-Gulf link

  • The security of the Indian Subcontinent and the Gulf region have always been inter-linked.
  • During British era, the Raj offered security protection, a framework for commerce and some administrative support.
  • Independent India tended to underestimate the importance of the strategic intimacy with the Gulf.

Pakistan replaced India in Gulf

  • Pakistan became a member of CENTO which led to its cooperation with a number of countries in the Gulf region.
  • India steadily lost political ground to Pakistan in the 1970s.
  • Matters got worse in the 1980s as India remained silent on the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan.
  • The 1990s saw Pakistan mobilise significant support to castigate India’s

The winds of change

  • The nuclear tests by India and Pakistan and the Kargil crisis in led to restructuring of South Asia’s relations with the Gulf.
  • During the Kargil War, Saudi Arabia encourage Pakistan to pull it’s army back.
  • That Jaswant Singh was the first Indian foreign minister to ever visit Saudi Arabia in late 2000.
  • The bilateral relationship with Saudi Arabia kept on improving since then.

 

 

 

Gist of Editorials: Ensure A Minimum Income For All | GS – II


Relevance : GS Paper II (Development and Welfare)


Why has this issue cropped up?

The idea of a universal basic income (UBI) is gaining ground globally.

What is UBI ?

It requires the government to pay every citizen a fixed amount of money on a regular basis and without any conditionalities.

Why a UBI ?

Millions of people remain unemployed and are extremely poor.

Limited Version of UBI

Govt has unfolded a limited version of the UBI in the form of the PM-KISAN.

Where will  UBI Work ?

  • It is not a substitute for basic public services.
  • There is need to transfer money only to extremely poor such as landless labourers, agricultural workers and marginal farmers.

How the Above Groups  are at Disadvantage?

  • Institutional credits for these groups are very low.
  • They have to borrow from moneylenders at exorbitant interest rates.
  • Benefits of subsidised fertilizers and power do not reach
  • Automation of low-skill jobs and formalisation of the retail sector have redered them jobless.

How can UBI Help these Groups?

  • An income support can be a good supplement to their livelihoods.
  • This additional income can reduce the incidence of indebtedness.
  • Can improve nutrient intake and increase enrolment and school attendance.
  • Improved health and educational outcomes and hence a more productive workforce.
  • It will reduce income inequalities.
  • Increased demand due to increased income will promote economic activities in rural areas.

Can UBI Discourage Beneficiaries from Seeking Work?

The income support suggested above is not too large to discourage beneficiaries from seeking work.

Can UBI Replace Basic Services?

UBI will deliver the benefits only if it comes on top of public services such as health and education.

How to Make UBI Effective?

  • transfer the money into the bank accounts of women.
  • Budgetary allocation for basic services should be raised significantly.
  • Programmes such as MGNREGS should also stay.
  • It will have to be restricted to the poorest of poor households.
  • Aadhaar can be used to rule out duplications and perform updation.
  • The tax kitty can be expanded by reintroducing wealth tax.
  • The cost of UBI will have to be shared by States.

Conclusion

The income transfer scheme is costly but poverty is much higher.


 

Editorial Simplified: The Basics are Vital| GS – II


Relevance :  GS Paper II


Theme of the Article

Making hospitalisation affordable will spell relief, but there is no alternative to strengthening primary health care.


Why has this Issue Cropped Up?

In 2011, a high-level expert group on universal health coverage reckoned that nearly 70% of government health spending should go to primary health care. The National Health Policy (NHP) 2017 also advocated allocating resources of up to two-thirds or more to primary care.


Is India on the Path of Providing Primary health Care?

  • Going by the government’s own estimate, in 2017, it would cost ₹16 lakh to convert a sub-health centre into a health and wellness centre. The current expenditure outlay is less than half of this conservative estimate.
  • Building health and wellness centres at the given rate (15,000 per year) can fulfil not even half the proposed target of 1.5 lakh health and wellness centres till 2022. Picture of extremes
  • The overall situation with the NHM, India’s flagship programme in primary health care, continues to be dismal. The NHM’s share in the health budget fell from 73% in 2006 to 50% in 2019 in the absence of uniform and substantial increases in health spending by States.
  • Today, the condition of our primary health infrastructure is lamentable: there is a shortage of PHCs (22%) and sub-health centres (20%), while only 7% sub-health centres and 12% primary health centres meet Indian Public Health Standards (IPHS) norms.
  • Further, numerous primary-level facilities need complete building reconstruction, as they operate out of rented apartments and thatched accommodations, and lack basic facilities such as toilets, drinking water and electricity.
  • There is a staggering shortage of medical and paramedical staff at all levels of care: 10,907 auxiliary nurse midwives and 3,673 doctors are needed at sub-health and primary health centres, while for community health centres the figure is 18,422 specialists.

Significance of Primary Health Care

  • While making hospitalisation affordable brings readily noticeable relief, there is no alternative to strengthening primary health care in the pursuit of an effective and efficient health system.
  • It’s role shall also be critical in the medium and long terms to ensure the success and sustainability of the PMJAY insurance scheme, as a weak primary health-care system will only increase the burden of hospitalisation.

Conclusion

Apart from an adequate emphasis on primary health care, there is a need to depart from the current trend of erratic and insufficient increases in health spending and make substantial and sustained investments in public health over the next decade. Without this, the ninth dimension (‘Healthy India’) of “Vision 2030” will remain unfulfilled.