Gist of Editorials: A Shot in the Arm (Indian Express) | GS – II

Relevance: GS Paper II (Development & Welfare)

[850 words reduced to 250]


  • The under-five mortality rates In India have declined considerably from 126 in 1990 to 39 in 2017.
  • The journey of Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP) has been further bolstered by Mission Indradhanush.
  • The importance of vaccines in India
    • Around 27 million children are born every year in India.
    • India also has the largest burden of under-five mortality.
    • 0.1 million children die due to rotavirus-induced diarrhoea .
    • Unimmunised and partially-immunised children are most vulnerable to diseases and disability.
  • Challenges to vaccination programme
    • Low full immunisation coverage (65 per cent),
    • limited basket of vaccines and,
    • quality and logistics of vaccine management
  • Mission Indradhanush
    • To hasten the coverage to at least 90 per cent till 2020, the Mission Indradhanush was launched in 2014.
    • seven vaccines would be given to all children and pregnant women who have missed out.
    • It would cover all far-flung areas.
    • To focus onto the least vaccinated areas, MI has been transformed into “Intensified Mission Indradhanush” (IMI)
    • There is a sharper focus on surveillance activities
    • It has led to increase to 7 per cent in full immunisation coverage in one year from 1 per cent in the past.
    • aims to achieve 90 per cent immunisation by December 2018.
    • aims to achieve SDG-3 by 2030
  • An immunisation programme is the most cost-effective public health intervention.

 

Editorial Simplified: A Shot in the Arm | GS – II

Relevance: GS Paper II (Development & Welfare)


Theme of the article

The under-five mortality rates have declined considerably from 126/1000 live births in 1990 to 39/1000 in 2017, much faster than the global rates. Much of this can be attributed to the successful immunisation programme in India.


Introduction

Mission Indradhanush (MI), one of the largest public health programmes in the world, and one of the greatest health-related accomplishments of India , was launched in 2014.


The importance of vaccines in India

  • Around 27 million children are born every year in India.
  • India also has the largest burden of under-five mortality, more than what prevails in some of the poorest countries in the world. Nearly 39 children under the age of five years die for every 1,000 live births each year — pneumonia and diarrhoea are the leading killers.
  • Approximately 0.1 million children die due to rotavirus-induced diarrhoea alone, which is around 50 per cent of all deaths attributed to diarrhoea.
  • Unimmunised and partially-immunised children are most vulnerable to diseases and disability, and are at three to six times higher risk of death than fully immunised children.
  • A large percentage of under-five mortality in India can be averted through vaccination.

Challenges to vaccination programme

India faces a threefold challenge:

  • Low full immunisation coverage (65 per cent),
  • limited basket of vaccines and,
  • issues regarding quality and logistics of vaccine management for such a vast and diverse country.

Mission Indradhanush

  • India’s full immunisation coverage (FIC), which used to be 61 per cent in 2009, improved to 65 per cent in 2013 at a meagre increase rate of 1 per cent per year.
  • To hasten the full coverage to at least 90 per cent till 2020, the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare launched Mission Indradhanush in 2014.
  • Under this, seven vaccines would be given to all those children and pregnant women who have missed out or are left out under the routine immunisation rounds. It would cover all far-flung areas.
  • To bring sharper focus onto the least vaccinated areas, MI has been transformed into “Intensified Mission Indradhanush” (IMI) that aims to reach those rural and urban slums that have under-performed during MI. One hundred and ninety high-focus districts and urban areas across 24 states have been selected for such intensified efforts.
  • There is a sharper focus on surveillance activities and to create partnerships with states, community-level departments and ministries for grass roots implementation and monitoring.
  • Mission Indradhanush has led to an impressive increase of close to 7 per cent in full immunisation coverage in one year as compared to 1 percent increase per year in the past. This is apart from the Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP) which targets to vaccinate about 27 million children against 12 deadly diseases every year, more children than any other similar programme in the world through more than nine million immunisation sessions conducted annually.
  • It now aims to achieve 90 per cent immunisation by December 2018.
  • On a global scale, MI/IMI is meant to reduce India’s contribution to the global burden of disease, including deaths in children under five, thereby achieving SDG-3 by 2030.
  • The journey of Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP), which India embarked upon in 1985, has been further bolstered by Mission Indradhanush/Intensified Mission Indradhanush.

Conclusion

An immunisation programme, anywhere in the world, is the most cost-effective public health intervention. It is the basic and foremost right of children across the globe, that they receive a safe and effective “shot in the arm” in a timely manner. This is the minimum which any country must deliver to save their children from vaccine preventable diseases.


 

Gist of Editorials: An Invitation to Corruption (The Hindu) | GS – II

Relevance : GS Paper II (Polity & Governance)

[1300 words reduced to 125]


  • The government recently introduced an Electoral Bond Scheme to cleanse the mechanism of funding to political parties.
  • Problems with the scheme:
    • There is no ceiling on party expenditure and the EC cannot monitor it
    • The scheme permits “every artificial juridical person,” to purchase bonds
    • The scheme allows for complete anonymity of the donor
    • Now, even loss-making entities can make unlimited contributions
    • Now, even shell companies can donate
  • Violation of the constitution
    • The legislation was passed as a money bill under Article 110, which it does not seem to be.
    • The scheme subverts the fundamental rights since due to anonymity of the donor, a citizen cannot meaningfully participate in politics.
  • The electoral bonds scheme, unless improved, may damage India’s democratic edifice.

 

Editorial Simplified: An Invitation to Corruption | GS – II

Relevance: GS Paper II (Polity & Governance)


Theme of the article

The Electoral Bond Scheme inhibits the citizen’s capacity to meaningfully participate in political and public life.


Why has this issue cropped up?

Early this year the government introduced an Electoral Bond Scheme purportedly with a view to cleansing the prevailing culture of political sponsorship.


Problems with the electoral bond

  • There is no ceiling on party expenditure and the EC (Election Commission) cannot monitor it, then how can one be sure that what is coming in is not black money as there is a secrecy of the donor.
  • Too opaque In its present form, the scheme permits not only individuals and body corporates, but also “every artificial juridical person,” to purchase bonds.
  • The scheme allows for complete anonymity of the donor. Neither the purchaser of the bond nor the political party receiving the donation is mandated to disclose the donor’s identity. Therefore, not only will, say, the shareholders of a corporation be unaware of the company’s contributions, but the voters too will have no idea of how, and through whom, a political party has been funded.
  • Just as damaging to the most basic democratic ideals is the elimination of a slew of other barriers that were in place to check the excesses of corporate political sponsoring. For instance, the programme removes an existing condition that had prohibited companies from donating anything more than 7.5% of their average net-profit over the previous three years. This now means that even loss-making entities can make unlimited contributions.
  • The requirement that a corporation ought to have been in existence for at least three years before it could make donations — a system that was meant to stop shell concerns from being created with a view purely to syphoning money into politics — has also been removed

Violation of the constitution

  • Article 110 of the Constitution allows the Speaker to classify a proposed legislation as a money bill, only when the draft law deals with all or any of the subjects enlisted in the provision. It’s impossible to see how the provisions pertaining to the electoral bond scheme could possibly fall within any of these categories.
  • The scheme subverts the fundamental rights to equality and freedom of expression. There’s no doubt that the Constitution does not contain an explicitly enforceable right to vote. But implicit in its guarantees of equality and free speech is a right to knowledge and information. In the absence of complete knowledge about the identities of those funding the various different parties, it’s difficult to conceive how a citizen can meaningfully participate in political and public life.

Conclusion

The electoral bonds scheme , unless immediately rescinded, may well irredeemably damage India’s democratic edifice.


 

CSE-2019 | Prelims Daily Quiz 60

Question:

Q. With reference to ‘Hand-in-Hand ’, which of the following statements is/are True?

1. It is a term related to defence.

2. It is used in context of India, China and Russia.

 

Select the correct answer using the code given below:

a) 1 only

b) 2 only

c) Both 1 and 2

d) Neither 1 nor 2

a) 1 only

  • Hand-in-Hand is a military exercise.
  • It is conducted annually between armies of India and China.

Geography (Optional) Test Series (10 Tests) for CSE-2019 – Starts 23rd December 2018


Under the Guidance of Asst. Professor, Delhi University (DU), having good experience in the UPSC field


Starts from 23rd December, 2018

10 Tests (8 Sectional + 2 Full Length)

Fee: Rs. 15,000/- (Inclusive of All Taxes)


FEATURES OF CHROME IAS TEST SERIES

Limited Enrollments – This is to ensure that due attention is given to the candidates so as to guide them on “How to Improve Answer Writing “, which is often not the case when the number is huge. So, with this aspirants can be personally attended to.

Personal Interaction – Offline + Telephonic – We believe that it’s not enough to evaluate the script, in the current pattern when competition is tough, every stakeholder has to walk an extra mile. We intend to communicate to the aspirant via personal sessions and regularly providing the required inputs to the student. This ensures a gradual understanding of mistakes, without which one cannot improve.

UPSC Pattern – Question Papers are prepared strictly as per the current UPSC pattern.

Stress is on evaluating analytical skills of the aspirant rather than cramming skills.


Geography (Optional) Test Series Features


Each test may have questions from previous test topics in order to keep you aware of previous studies and streamline revisions.

Each test shall also consist with compulsory Map Questions.

Each test shall be strictly UPSC mains pattern (questions configuration and marks allotments).

Solutions of each test will be given before or after discussion of test.

Each test will follow discussion on content and presentation of answers.

Videos Discussions available.


Test Series Plan


Geography Test Series Test Plan - Chrome IAS


References:

PAPER I

1. Geomorphology by P. Dayal.
2. Physical Geography by A.N. Strahler
3. Climatology by Critchfield, D.S. Lal
4. Oceanography by Sharma and Vatal
5. Biogeography and Environment by H.M. Saxena/Savinder Singh
6. Perspectives in Human Geography by Sudeepta Adhikari/ Maurya
7. Economic Geography: Human and Economic Geography by Leong and Morgan/ Economic Geography by Alexander.
8. Population Geography by R.C. Chandna
9. Settlement Geography: a) Rural Settlement by R.Y. Singh, b) Urban Settlement by H. Ramachandran.
10. Regional planning by R.P. Mishra.
11. Models, Theories and Laws in Human Geography: Majid Hussain.

PAPER II

1. Geography of India by R.C. Tiwari
2. Geography of India by Gopal Singh
3. Yojana and Kurukshetra magazines.
4. Geography and You journal
5. Atlas:- a) Oxford Student Atlas, b) Orient Blackswan
6. Ministry of Environment and Forest News
7. All reference news in current events.


OBJECTIVES OF CHROME IAS TEST SERIES

It is important to understand at the first place, “What should be the motive of Test Series”? If it is to have more and more questions being repeated, then perhaps best would be to take all sources and Compile in a document which at times is so bulky but in reality has very little substance.

Criteria of joining a test series should neither be that whether few of our questions appear directly in the exam nor should it be the objective of an aspirant before joining test series. The important and perhaps the only question is how have you trained your mind to respond to the main and the final event which comes after an exhaustive and well-designed test program clubbed with right feedback. This remains our never-ending endeavor at Chrome IAS Academy to provide the same.

So we believe that enrolling for test series at Chrome IAS Academy is justified as it serves the following purposes:

First is “Training of Mind”, if that is achieved half of the battle is won. And the primary purpose of the test series at Chrome IAS Academy is this.

Second important aspect of our well-crafted program is to act as a “Priming factor”. It has to prepare you for the final event and act as a close rehearsal. Though initially we started off with a Comprehensive Test module, but on demand from aspirants, this year we have come up with a Sectional Plan, so as to keep aspirants in a step wise learning model.

Third purpose of Chrome IAS Main Examination Test Series is to give you a platform to “Revisit important issues” and also topics that might have skipped your gaze. Also to implement what you have learnt over time and see where you stand as comparison to others.

Fourth and perhaps the most important aspect is the “Right Feedback” which is customized based on the assessment of the aspirant by our experts.


Note: Changes in the Test Schedule may be made due to unforeseen circumstances with or without any prior notice. The Institute shall not be responsible for any loss or liability suffered by the students arising out of such adjustments in the Schedule.


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